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Real Customer Question: I'm adopted and have a relationship with both my birth parents and my adoptive parents. How will a chart work for me?

Real Customer Question: I'm adopted and have a relationship with both my birth parents and my adoptive parents. How will a chart work for me?

Special family circumstances can make creating a family tree a little less straightforward, so since we spend a LOT of time thinking about family trees we're more than happy to help you brainstorm the perfect way to create a family tree print that meets your families needs. Here's a real customer question we received about a unique family circumstance.

Q: I'm adopted and have a relationship with both my birth parents and my adoptive parents. How will a chart work for me?

A: How amazing that you have relationships with both your birth parents and your adoptive parents! The short answer is... use multiple charts! :)

Clearly, you can get as creative as you want, but here are a couple options we thought might look lovely. 

Option 1: The mega-combo chart.

By completely hiding the second generation, you could place yourself at the center and then have four parents in the very next generation. Here's a little video tutorial that shows you how to hide a generation in this scenario.

 

 

 From there, you'll just need to add the names for each line in manually, and voila!

adoptive and birth families in one chart

Option 2: Create one chart for your birth parents and another for your adoptive parents.

Then you could either use an external program such as Adobe Photoshop, Sketch or Figma to merge the two charts into one JPG you can print, or hang the charts separately side by side in matching frames. Either would look fantastic!

Do you have special family circumstances you need some help coming up with a creative solution for? Check out our other posts about special circumstances or shoot us an email to hello@familytreeprints.com!

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Real Customer Question: I'm a single mom/divorced with 4 kids--is there a chart for me?

Real Customer Question: I'm a single mom/divorced with 4 kids--is there a chart for me?

We figure if one person has a question... other people probably do too! Since we're here to make sure you know how to make a family tree (and specifically how to make a family tree for YOUR family), we're here to help! Today's real customer question is:

Q: I'm a single mom/divorced with 4 kids--is there a chart for me?

A: The short answer is YES!

The long answer is, yes, and here are some ideas on how you can create a chart that's perfect for your particular family situation.

If you're hoping to just have the chart reflect your children, you and YOUR genealogy, we'd highly recommend using the center circle to your advantage by putting both yourself and your children in there. Let's do an example with a mom named Jane Doe, and her four children Peter John, Susan Marie, Edmund Mark and Lucy Madeline.

In the center of your family tree chart, you could just put a generic "Our Family", "Our Heritage", or a more specific "The Doe Family".

family tree chart for divorced parent and children

Alternatively, if you'd like for the individual names to be displayed, you could change the format of the center cell to be "Horizontal Multiline" and type the following into the center individuals place:

Jane~Doe  Peter~John Susan~Marie Edmund~Mark Lucy~Madeline

Note: A ~ signifies that you'd like the joined words to stay on the same line, a space signifies a return or enter.

family tree chart for divorced mom and family option 2

Both of these options put Jane and her children in the "1st generation", and Jane's parents in the second generation. If you're importing from FamilySearch, Jane would choose herself to be the center of the chart, and then manually edit the center information by clicking on it in the chart and editing the text manually. View a tutorial on that here.

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