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How To Create a Family Tree For A Child

How To Create a Family Tree For A Child

Our family tree charts for kids are oh-so-cute, and having one in their bedroom is delightfully fun. At least, that's what we've heard from our customers, and what we've seen here at home. We made this cute whale chart for my son's room and then brought it with us to Rootstech to display. As we pulled it out of the suitcase as we were unpacking, he picked it right up and proceeded to totter around with it for 25 minutes (which is quite the attention span for a 15-month-old). Does he know what it is? I highly doubt it (even though I've talked to him about it several times), but he does REALLY like it. It could be the bright colors. It could be the unique shape (with all these cool flappy things on the back!). But I hope it's also because he has some sense that it's his.

Ready to get started making a family tree chart for your child? Here's how!

1. Choose a starting template.

2. Import your child's genealogy from FamilySearch or enter the names manually.

Pro-tip: You can just use YOUR FamilySearch account, and choose "Child of [Yourself]" from the drop-down menu for who is at the center. If you haven't synced with your spouse yet on FamilySearch, you'll want to either do that before or just enter their side of the chart manually--it's pretty fast for kids charts!

3. Play with colors!

This is my favorite part. Go to Advanced > Palettes, and click through different palettes to see what a pink ombre ladybug looks like, or discover how to turn a whale into a shark! You can also totally customize the colors by choosing Advanced > Colors.

4. (Optional) Add a text decal.

Since your child's name won't be displayed in the chart itself, you can add their name as a text decal at the bottom.

5. Order your chart and print it!

A normal home printer with normal printer paper works great for most kids charts. The colors may be a little off depending on how nice of a printer you have, but it should look great anyways :)

Ready to get started? Choose a starting template here.

 

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Free Chart Preview: See What Your Genealogy Could Look Like

Free Chart Preview: See What Your Genealogy Could Look Like

There's something magical about seeing your personal family history in visual form that inspires and awes and invokes deep feelings of love and belonging. The thought of having your own family tree chart may be nice, but that magical moment is definitely when you can see EXACTLY what it would look like that will make you say, "Wow."

Each family is unique, so why should you have to commit to purchasing a specific template before you know what the finished product will look like? And for that matter, why do you have to use a one-size-fits-all template at all?

The answer to both of those questions is... well, you shouldn't. That's why you can preview your personal genealogy in one of our custom family trees for free! Once you've imported your genealogy from FamilySearch or a GEDCOM file, you can adjust the number of generations you want to be displayed (based on how far back your genealogy goes and how many gaps you want to show) and whether or not you want dates displayed, as well as the shape, color, font, etc. of the chart in general.

So how do you get this free preview? Well, it's easy! 


1. Go to familytreeprints.com and choose a starting template. 


Note: Peruse at your leisure, but also don't feel trapped or committed once you choose. You'll be able to switch to a different template entirely or modify shape, palette, font, or individual colors once you're in our family tree maker app.


2. Choose the number of generations you think you'd like displayed in your chart and click "Start from this template".


Note: When in doubt, start with more generations than you think you'll need so that all of your names get imported. You can always decrease the number of generations showing later and the cost of your chart (if you choose to buy it!) will decrease accordingly.


3. Import your names from FamilySearch or a GEDCOM file, or enter them manually.


Now you have a free preview of your chart using our family tree maker! You can play with the number of generations showing, the shape of the chart, the color palette, individual colors in a chart, the font, the width of a generation band, whether or not the dates are showing and so much more. Then, when you're in love with how your chart looks, just click "Order Your Chart" and you'll have a print-ready genealogy wall chart that will have everyone who walks by saying "Wow" too!

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Family Tree Creator: How To Use The Family Tree Prints Web App

Family Tree Creator: How To Use The Family Tree Prints Web App

Want to make a custom family tree using our online family tree creator? We've got you covered with this tutorial on how to use our family tree maker app to create your very own family tree print.

Feel free to either watch the video version or read on! 

 

1.Start from www.familytreeprints.com and choose a family tree template to start from. Once you've found a template that you like, choose the number of generations you'd like displayed in your family tree print and click "Start from this template." This will drop you into our family tree creator app.

2. Now it's time to enter your names into your blank family tree template. You can either do that manually or use our FamilySearch import or GEDCOM import functionality. If you're using the FamilySearch import, after you've authenticated with FamilySearch and been brought back to our family tree creator, you'll select who you want to be at the center of your chart. You'll have the choice of yourself, your spouse (if you've connected with them in FamilySearch) and "Child of [yourself]". If you want both your and your spouse's family history to be in the same chart you'll do "Child of [yourself],"  even if you don't actually have any children.

3. Next check to make sure all your ancestors' names are visible and aren't being cut off, and then customize the family tree template however you'd like to. Read this article about the most common tweaks you'll want to make in our family tree creator.

Ready to create your own custom chart? Choose a starting template here.

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How To Make a Family Tree: How to create a chart for a family's genealogy (parents and children)?

How To Make a Family Tree: How to create a chart for a family's genealogy (parents and children)?

This blog post details how to create a chart 

featuring a family (parents and children) at the center. If you would like to format your chart to feature a husband and wife as the center of the genealogy chart, click here. If you would like to create a chart 

featuring a single individual at the center, click here.

If you're trying to create a family tree for a family, there are a couple things you should take into account when considering your formatting, but the primary consideration is if your family is still quickly growing and changing?

If your family is still growing...

and more children are expected with relative frequency, you may not wish you add each of the children's names to the chart in case it becomes outdated too quickly (depending on how often you want to update and reprint!) We find that it works for many families to simply treat the chart as they would if they were creating a chart for a couple, and then add a text decal such as "The Doe Family" to tie it together as a family chart.

add text decal to family chart

If your family has stopped growing...

(in terms of no longer adding additional children to the family, in-laws and grandchildren won't affect the chart formatting), you can continue to treat the chart as it were just for a couple as described above, or you could choose to follow the shape choices and recommendations for creating a chart for a single individual, and place all your children at the center. 

Pro tip: You may need to increase the center generation's radius to help all your children's names fit. Do this using the "Generation Width" slider at the bottom of the main "Chart" tab.

how to make a family tree with all your children's names

If you're looking for a run-down of many of the different options available for formatting a family tree chart for a little family, we'd recommend this blog post about creating a family tree chart for your parents, which is broadly applicable in terms of formatting!

 

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How To Make a Family Tree: How to create a chart for a husband and wife's genealogy?

How To Make a Family Tree: How to create a chart for a husband and wife's genealogy?

This blog post details how to format your chart to feature a husband and wife as the center of the genealogy chart. If you would like to create a chart featuring a single individual at the center, click here. If you would like to create a chart featuring a family (parents and children) at the center, click here.

If you'd like to create a genealogy wall chart featuring a husband and wife's genealogy, there are a couple different ways you can format your chart, depending on if you'd like to create a fan-shaped family tree chart or a circle-shaped family tree chart. You can modify ANY STARTING TEMPLATE to fix any of these models, so the sky's the limit. Let's break it down.

Note: If you're importing your genealogy from FamilySearch, be sure to choose "Child of [You]" from the drop-down, even if you don't have children to get both your and your spouse's genealogy. For more detailed instructions, check out this post.

For a circle-shaped family tree chart:

To feature a husband and wife's genealogy, you'll want to change your chart's shape to our "360 Horizontal" circle. To do this once you've chosen a starting template and are in our family tree maker app, click "Advanced", then "Shape" and select "360 Horizontal" by clicking on the preview.

how to make a family tree for a husband and wife's genealogy

To add a little extra something, you can also add an ampersand "&" or "+" to the center of the circle. To do this, choose "Advanced">"Generation">Select "1st Generation" from the drop-down. Then navigate to the MAIN "Chart" tab (not within the "Advanced" settings) and edit the name in the text box to say & or +.

how to make a family tree with an & in the middle

For a fan-shaped family tree chart:

The best way to adapt a fan chart to be for just a couple is to "hide" the center circle, or adding your last initial, an ampersand or plus sign large in the center circle. 

To add a large symbol to the center of your chart, make sure you're on the main "Chart" tab, and then click the center circle of your genealogy chart. The simply type "&", "+", or the first letter of the couple's last name in the "Name" text box. Then drag the "Generation Font Size" slider to the desired size.

how to add symbol to chart center

If you'd like to modify the color of the center symbol to give it a little extra pizazz, choose "Advanced"> "Color" > click the swatch under "Text Color" and choose the color you'd like.

how to add color to symbol in center

To "hide" the center circle, choose "Advanced" > "Color" > click the swatch under "Background Color" and choose white.

how to make a family tree

how to hide center of genealogy wall chart

You can also choose to change the shape to a Half Circle (which eliminates the center circle entirely. You can do this by choosing "Advanced" > "Shape" > "Half Circle".

how to make a family tree for a couple

For more tips on making a chart featuring a husband and wife's genealogy check out our tutorial on how to create a chart using two separate FamilySearch accounts and how to sync with your spouse on FamilySearch.

Ready to get started? Choose a starting tutorial from here.

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Need a 10 Generation Family Tree Chart? Here's a hack.

Need a 10 Generation Family Tree Chart? Here's a hack.

We recently had a customer write in who was working on an incredible family history project for which she needed a 10-11 generation family tree chart, rather than the 9 generations currently offered on our site. We put in a little back door for her, so we figure that if you're looking for a way to create a 10 generation family tree using our awesome family tree maker app, we'd leave this treasure map behind for you as well. Here's how you do it!

1. Choose any number of generations in the template you'd like to use as your starting template, and then click "Start from this template."

2. This will drop you in our family tree maker app. Click on the Advanced tab in the left hand side bar, and then choose the Chart tab within the Advanced Settings.

3. Move the Generations slider to 10.

Note: You CANNOT use the Generations slider in the main "Chart" tab to access 10 generations. Only the Generations slider on the "Chart" tab within the "Advanced" settings will give you access to it. ALSO, increasing the number of generations in your chart to 10 will increase the cost of your chart to $69.95

4. Import your names from FamilySearch or via GEDCOM upload, or enter your names manually!

Note: It's important to increase the number of generations to 10 before importing from FamilySearch, because only the number of visible generations will be imported. If your chart only has 5 generations when you import, and then you increase the number of generations visible in your chart to 10, you'll have to clear your names, and then reimport from FamilySearch to ensure the outer 5 generations aren't left blank.

And voila! Now you have a 10 generation family tree chart! Ready to choose your starting template? Click here!

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How To Make a Family Tree: Adding Marriage Dates, Birth and Death Places, and Vocations To Your Genealogy Wall Chart

How To Make a Family Tree: Adding Marriage Dates, Birth and Death Places, and Vocations To Your Genealogy Wall Chart

By default, if you're using our FamilySearch Integration or GEDCOM import functionality your ancestors' names, birth years and death years will be imported and added to your chart.

example of family tree - 6 generation genealogy wall chart

We made this choice to favor simplicity and consistency across a range of charts, but if you're looking to add more detail to your chart you absolutely can, and it's as easy as pie. Some things our community has wanted to add in the past? The month and date of the birth and death, a marriage date, the location of the birth, death, and/or marriage, and their ancestor's vocation or profession. While we'd highly recommend not including all of that information--let's face it, you'd have to make the text so tiny it would be illegible--you can add an additional detail or two to your chart. Here's how!

To flesh out birth and death dates more fully, just edit those individual fields within the main "Chart" tab.

how to make a family tree: before modifying dates how to make a family tree: after modifying dates

To add any of the other additional details (locations, marriage date, vocation, etc.) your secret weapon is that name text box.

The name text box is WYSIWYG editable just as any Word Document or email processor is. Type the information as you'd like it to be displayed in any given cell, and... voila. Here are a few examples.

example of how to make a family tree 1 example of how to make a family tree 2

example of how to make a family tree 3 example of how to make a family tree 4

To help distinguish the most important information (often the name) from the details, it may help to play with capitalization. By default, many templates change everything to uppercase, so if you'd like to change that choose Advanced > Chart > Choose "Normal" rather than "Uppercase" from the Text Transform dropdown at the bottom.

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5 Tips For How To Make a Family Tree Chart That Looks Spectacular

5 Tips For How To Make a Family Tree Chart That Looks Spectacular

If you're going to have a family tree chart on display in your house, you want to make sure it not only goes with your personal decorating style but also looks absolutely spectacular in general. Here are 5 tips for creating a family tree chart that looks spectacular based on the 100's of charts we've seen and created.

1) Let your ancestors breathe.

Regardless of what template you choose, leave some "white space". Choose font sizes that allow for the names to be large enough to be readable and still fit comfortably within their cell. At all costs, avoid allowing the name to run into the edges of the cell--it makes the chart looked cramped and if you're not careful part of the name will get cut off to boot and your great grandmother's name with become ZABETH MART instead of ELIZABETH MARIEAU... and no one wants that.

Pro tip: Spilt long names onto multiple lines to remedy this. Here's how.

2) Margins matter.

This goes along with leaving space in each cell to allow your ancestors' names some breathing room--leave adequate outside margins. There are few things worse than a gorgeous family tree chart that runs into and gets cut off by its own frame. Since it's up to you to determine what size (and thereby ratio) you'd like to print it, the default margins are merely a guideline. When in doubt, pump them up a tad so you have some room to play with and be sure to preview your design wherever you choose to print it so you can be sure that too much white space isn't being cut off! To adjust the margins, choose "Advanced" > "Chart" > Drag the "Margin" slider.

3) Proofread.

We're HUGE fans of the import functionality ourselves, either from Family Search or via GEDCOM, because it saves us all a TON of time. Spend a few minutes of that time to proof-read your entire chart. The data is pulled in exactly as it is in FamilySearch or in the GEDCOM file, but that doesn't mean there aren't any typos that were part of the original data or funky characters that are hoping to be umlauts but weren't available in the font you've chosen. While you're at it, watch for any long names that might have escaped their bounds (see tip #1) or are overlapping with dates (even if it's only by a single letter). It's the little things.

4) Make a conscientious font choice.

Practically everything is customizable with our Family Tree Prints family tree maker: font, shape, size and each and every color. Changing the font will change the entire feel of your chart, so make sure you've chosen one that speaks to you and the level of formality you'd like your chart to express. For the perfect blend of readability and classiness, we're huge fans of either Montserrat or Cinzel, but ultimately the choice is yours!

5) Begin with the end in mind.

Think about where you'd like your chart to be displayed and how large you'd like it printed before finalizing your chart. We have some printing recommendations that can help if you need some additional guidance but in our experience the ideal number of generations, amount of information you'd like displayed in each generation of your family tree chart, font choice, color selection, etc., can all be impacted by the size and environment the chart will be living in.

Feeling ready to get started making your own custom family tree chart? Head on over and choose a template to get started with in our family tree maker!

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The Feature Update That Will Have Your Family Tree Chart Looking 10x Better

The Feature Update That Will Have Your Family Tree Chart Looking 10x Better

Here at Family Tree Prints, we're all about giving you the tools to create your family tree chart exactly to your tastes, which means the power to create a gorgeous genealogy tree is in your hands. If that's a little daunting, don't worry, just pick one of our handy templates to start from and then make sure you avoid these common mistakes. To make it that much easier for you to avoid some common pitfalls and make sure that your final family tree chart is absolutely stunning, let us introduce one new product feature, that although simple will rock your world and improve your chart... the power to split names onto multiple lines.

Expecting something different? Here's why it matters. We all have those few ancestors whose names seem to stretch for eons (I'm looking at you "Anna Katharina Elizabeth Rauschenberg"), who seem to sit right next "John Smith" in your family tree and make it incredibly difficult to accommodate both names in the same generation without it looking terrible. By allowing you to split names into multiple lines exactly where you'd like them split, you get even more control over your family tree chart aesthetic and readability soars. The best part? It's super intuitive. Just click on the cell you'd like to edit, and in the "Name:" field on the main "Chart" tab use the "Return/Enter" key just as you would in any email, presentation or word document.

Here's one example of before and after to show you how handy this feature is:

BEFORE

family tree chart with names cut off

In the three cells highlighted for you in red, you'll notice that the names are getting cut off. To remedy this, I could increase the size of the generation, but since all the other names look fantastic as is, this is a great candidate for where to break names onto multiple lines!

AFTER

how to make a family tree look great

Now the names are broken into multiple lines, and those generations look great! You may notice that many of the names in the outer generation are overlapping with their dates in the outside generation still. Since this occurs on so many, to fix this, I'll opt to increase the generation width size using the "Generation Width" slider bar on the main "Chart" tab. The final edits can be seen below.

example of family tree

Ready to get started making your own custom family tree chart? Be sure to use this feature once you choose a starting template!

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How To Make a Family Tree For a 90 Year Old (Hint: Readability is Key!)

How To Make a Family Tree For a 90 Year Old (Hint: Readability is Key!)

We recently had a customer write in looking for some advice on colors for a chart she was creating for her 90-year-old mother-in-law. We gave her some tips we'd learned creating a chart for my grandpa that are useful for anyone creating a genealogy chart for a member of this older generation.

Readability is king.

Creating a family tree chart for a parent or grandparent is a delightfully thoughtful gesture, that is sure to be appreciated... but it will be even better if they can read it, which means you need to take your recipient's eye-sight into account. This means:

  • Choosing a color palette that is high contrast and highly readable,
  • Choosing a readable font, and 
  • Using slight larger fonts than you might normally use,
  • Which may necessitate displaying slightly fewer generations to make everything fit.

Color Palettes

Unless one of our other color palettes speaks strongly to you based on your grandparents' personality and home decor, we recommend choosing a black and white or neutral color palette as a nice, safe option. Then, just make sure that the text color is sufficiently high contrast for old eyes to enjoy reading. If you determine that you'd like to make an adjustment to black (or white) from one of the more subtle hues sometimes used in our templates:

1) Click on the "Advanced" tab.

2) Click on the "Color" tab within the advanced settings.

3) Choose which cells' text colors you'd like to update from the drop-down menu (you can change the whole chart, each generation, alternating cells in a generation or an individual cell at a time)

4) Click the "Text Color" swatch, and choose the new color you'd like the text to be.

If you've found a color palette as part of a template you like, but want it to be in a different shape (fan instead of circle, or circle instead of fan), you just start from the original template, and then once you're in the editor choose Advanced > Shape and choose the shape you'd like the chart to be.

Font

Research has shown that the most readable fonts in printed material tend to be Serif (think Times New Roman), but letter width and spacing plays a role as well. You can change your chart's font by choosing Advanced > Chart and using the font drop-down menu. If you're looking for specific font recommendations, try Montserrat (which is a san serif font) or Cinzel (which is a serif font). In terms of sizing, there's no need to go crazy, bumping up the font sizes, but try to make them as big as you can while still keeping things looking nice.

Choosing What Information To Include

We have some general printing guidelines, which are still a good rule of thumb here, just lean slightly towards bigger. You can make room for added legibility by decreasing the number of generations that are visible, not displaying dates for all the generations, and/or making sure you put names on multiple lines (you can do this by simply hitting enter in Name: text box on the main "Chart" tab.)

If you have any specific questions, please feel free to shoot us an email at support@familytreeprints.com and we'd be happy to help!

 

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